Just over 12 years ago, an exciting, enthusiastic
teenager strode on to the field in Dublin,
opening the batting for the West Indies Women
in a match against Ireland Women. 90 runs
came from her bat and her historical innings in T20
International cricket began which has led to 3,000
T20 International runs, the second most in women’s
cricket history.

The 29-year-old reached the milestone in her 103rd
innings – during the September 23 second T20
International against England at Derby County
Ground. It came via overthrows at the non-striker’s
end as she got a two off the bowling of Natt Sciver.
A journey that started in the humblest of ways in
Spanish Town, has seen a young girl grow into one of
the legends of women’s cricket – Stafanie Taylor was
born to play cricket. Her coach back in those days saw
something in her that he knew would be suitable to the
sport we love, and he asked her to give it a try and as
they say, the rest is history.

Though a T20I century has been elusive, Stafanie has
so far recorded 21 half-centuries. When asked if she
would go after the triple figures if within sight or take
the team to victory, the selfless leader puts her hand up,
putting a team victory over personal statistics.
As one who leads by actions and not words, Stafanie can
seem almost shy or closed but that’s her armour, she lets
her batting and bowling speak for her. 3000 T20I runs is
by no means a small task to achieve. There are countless
hours and days of training, traveling, giving up family
and personal time to hone her talent and be the best
that she can be. Stafanie has now cemented her name in
history of West Indies Women’s cricket as being the first
to achieve 3,000 T20I runs.

A much sought after player in all the Women’s T20
franchise league around the world, Stafanie has
entertained spectators from New Zealand, to India in
the Women’s IPL exhibition games, to Australia in the
Women’s Big Bash League where she has featured for
the Sydney Thunder and Adelaide Strikers ironically her
Strikers team mate is the woman with most T20I runs,
Suzie Bates. And last but not least, she has played in the
CPL women’s exhibitions matches home here in the West
Indies.

Stafanie has won all the possible T20 titles, with the
exception of the Women’s IPL exhibition tournament.

She has been a part of winning teams of the Kia Super League and Women’s Big Bash League with Western Storm and Sydney Thunder respectively. But the biggest T20 title she has ever won was the ICC Women’s T20 World Cup in 2016, when she led the West Indies Women for the first time in an international tournament. Not only did she win the title but was also selected as the Player of the Tournament and selected by the ICC as Captain of the year of their ICC XI for 2016.

Twelve years has been a long but rewarding road for Stafanie but her innings isn’t over yet. Also 11 wickets shy of 100 T20I wickets, she has her sights set on becoming the first player, male or female to achieve the milestone of 3,000 T20I runs and 100 wickets.

Achievements and Awards:
• Order of Distinction (Jamaica)
• ICC Women’s Cricketer of the Year 2011
• ICC Women’s ODI Cricketer of the Year – 2012
• ICC Women’s T20I Cricketer of the Year – 2015
• Won ICC T20 Women’s World Cup in 2016
• Player of the Tournament – ICC Women’s T20 World Cup 2016
• The first female cricketer to score a century and to take four wickets in an innings of a Women’s ODI
• Member and Captain of the ICC Women’s T20 Team of the Year 2017
• West Indies Women’s ODI Player of the Year – 2007, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
• West Indies Women’s T20 Player of the Year – 2017
• Won WBBL with Sydney Thunder 2015-2016
• Won KIA Super League with Western Storm- 2017
• Won CWI Women’s Regional with Jamaica
• Currently (2020) ranked Number 1 in Women’s ODI Batting
• Currently (2020) ranked Number 2 in Women’s T20 All-Rounders
• 5th on All-time Women One Day International run-scorers with 4754 from 126 matches.
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